19.11.2016 - 07.05.2017

Schweizweit

ARCHITECTURE RÉCENTE EN SUISSE
ARCHITETTURA RECENTE IN SVIZZERA
RECENT ARCHITECTURE IN SWITZERLAND
 

In 1992 the artist Ben Vautier made a provocative statement with the inscription “La Suisse n’existe pas” at the entrance to the Swiss pavilion at the Expo in Seville. He wanted to point out the linguistic and cultural diversity of the country, but touched a sensitive nerve. It could equally be claimed that “L’architecture Suisse n’existe pas”. Whilst the image of Swiss architecture, especially internationally, is still strongly characterised by the 1990s and minimalism, the constructed reality is more regionally differentiated and heterogeneous: “Swiss architectures” rather than “Swiss architecture”.
The first exhibition under the leadership of S AM Director Andreas Ruby reflects his vision for the S AM: without thresholds, contemporary, collaborative, Switzerland-wide. In co-operation with 162 architectural practices from all regions of the country the S AM has created a visual atlas of current Swiss architecture. Switzerland is transported into the museum via large-format projections. The exhibition shows the commonalities and differences in the themes, content and formal strategies that Swiss architects focus on today.

Beitrag zu «Schweizweit» auf espazium!

Upcoming exhibitions

12.05. - 28.08.2022

Napoli Super Modern

„Napoli Super Modern“ is an homage to Naples. The Parisian office LAN and the photographer Cyrille Weiner provide insights and observations about the complex architecture and urban development of this maritime metropolis, with a focus on the years between 1930 and 1960.
 

Photo: Assimiliation douce, photography by Cyrille Weiner, out of the series Assimilation douce, Napoli, 2020

10.09. - 23.10.2022

Fall Exhibition

The fall exhibition of the S AM will be dedicated to a current topic in architecture. More detailed information follows.

11.11.2022 - 24.04.2023

New Architecture in Japan

This group show shines a light on young, lesser known architectural positions in Japan. In reaction to urgent problems of the present – climate crisis, social change, neoliberalism – these architects are exploring new ways of designing and working that also redefine the very role of the architect. 


Photo: Fuminori Nousaku & Mio Tsuneyama, Holes in the House, 2017– © Ryogo Utatsu